World Arts Programs & Courses


Intensives

We offer World Arts education at both the BA and MA level at GIAL.degrees

MA with Major in World Arts

The MA with a major in World Arts prepares students to work cross-culturally alongside singers, musicians, actors, dancers, storytellers, and visual artists, researching the arts of their community. Concentrations: Applied Arts, Arts & Islam, Arts & Scripture Engagement, Linguistics

BA with Major in International Service

GIAL offers junior and senior level undergraduate courses for a BA with a major in International Service (Students complete 54 undergraduate semester hours prior to attending GIAL).  Students major in International Service and choose at least one minor. Minors: World Arts, Cross-cultural Service, Linguistics, or TESOL

AA5357 Oral Tradition and Literature (Fall) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to describe different genres of oral traditions and the roles they serve in cultures worldwide. These oral traditions will come from cultures with both written and unwritten languages. Students will be able to describe both the process and the product of transmission of oral traditions. They will be able to use various field methods for collecting oral traditions.

WA3381 Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Undergraduate credits)

In this undergrad course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context. This course is also available at the graduate level by registering for WA5381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ.

WA3384 Theory and Practice of Ethnodoxology (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This course explores the biblical foundations and practical ways of engaging contextual art forms in worship and witness around the world.

WA3386 World Arts Practicum (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This course entails acquiring the performance and artistic skills needed for cross-cultural participation in one of the artistic traditions of a community.  Emphasis is on developing an understanding of how to perform within the context of a chosen tradition, including researching this tradition and how it functions artistically and socially in its community.  The choice of ethnic ensemble or mentoring relationships will vary depending upon the artistic tradition chosen for study and availability of local mentors.  Students will take initiative in choosing and engaging their mentor in consultation with the course head.

WA4322 Video Production and Editing (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This course offers practical experience in video creation, production, directing, and editing.

WA4382 Survey of World Arts (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This course teaches introductory methods for examining artistic expressions of cultures around the world.

WA4387 Area Studies for World Arts (Spring) (3 Undergraduate credits)

This course is an introduction to the expressive culture and arts in one area or sub-area of the world. Areas may be all or significant parts (not single countries) of sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, Asia, Eurasia, or Oceania, depending on instructor availability.

WA5339 Research Methods for World Arts (Fall) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to describe and interact with the people, structures, dynamics, meanings, and processes involved in creativity and performance in an ethnolinguistically defined community. They will be able to plan and perform research tasks using methodologies such as interview, observation, participation, note taking, and audio and video-recording, in ways that will help answer questions such as the following: What kinds of arts exist locally? How do arts function in local, regional, and international communities? Which art forms might be most appropriate to carry Christian messages? What factors might affect the acceptance or rejection of indigenous-style performances by community members?

WA5381 Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Graduate credits)

In this grad-level course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context. This course is also available at the undergraduate level by registering for WA3381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ.

WA5382 Applied Arts (Fall) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to work with a local community to catalyze the creation of new vernacular Scripture-based and community-development messages in indigenous forms of artistic communication. They will be able to encourage sustainability by helping integrate these expressions into local community life; designing interactive, dialogue-based learning activities for arts-discovery and arts-creation workshops; mentoring local artists; promoting the dissemination of indigenous Christian works; and encouraging the positive self-identity that these forms may engender.

WA5383 Arts and Trauma Healing (Intensive) (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

This course teaches a holistic, interactive approach to engaging Scripture in the healing process for people who suffer from the mental, emotional, and spiritual effects of trauma. It combines biblical truths with basic mental health principles expressed in ways that can be easily translated into other languages. Students learn to address both cognitive beliefs and emotions damaged by trauma, both in their own lives and in the lives of others. They learn to use participatory learning methods to train local church leaders in ways that help them to become effective care-givers. In particular, this course will emphasize the importance of performing and visual arts in trauma healing. Students will understand and be able to articulate and demonstrate the role, the value, and the effectiveness of using the arts in trauma healing from a historical and contemporary perspective. Students will be able to promote emotional and spiritual healing in traumatized communities through the use of local visual and performing arts existing in those communities.

Crafted as a “blended” course, with readings and assignments completed online during Sessions 1-2, the course also requires a two-week period of on-campus participatory afternoon classes. For details, see the Arts and Trauma Healing FAQ.

WA5384 Expressive Form Analysis (Fall) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to perform initial structural analyses of the musical, verbal, dramatic, dance, and visual features of an ethnolinguistic community’s artistic genres. Artistic objects and performances will be examined through seven analytical lenses: space, materials, participant organization, shape of the event through time, performance features, content, and underlying symbolic systems. Cross-cultural analytical skills learned during the course will enable students to contribute vitally to communities’ efforts to address their local needs and aspirations. Instructional methodologies include participation in these arts.

WA5385 Song Transcription and Analysis (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to employ a variety of methodologies for the transcription and analysis of musical features of song, i.e., vocal music. Emphasis will be placed upon developing the student’s capacity to recognize the salient musical features of a song in any world music tradition, and describe its features graphically, textually, and orally. Toward that end, students will (1) examine readings from select ethnomusicological literature on musical transcription and analysis and (2) transcribe, analyze, and describe songs from several of the world’s diverse song traditions.

WA5386 Directed Practicum in World Arts (Online) (Spring/Fall) (3 Graduate credits)

This course entails acquiring the performance and artistic skills needed for cross-cultural participation in one of the artistic traditions of a community. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of how to perform within the context of a chosen tradition, including researching this tradition and how it functions artistically and socially in its community. The choice of ethnic ensemble or mentoring relationships will vary depending upon the artistic tradition chosen for study and availability of local mentors. The students will take initiative in choosing and engaging their mentor in consultation with the course head. This course may be retaken if the genre studied is completely different from a previous session.

WA5389 Advanced Form Analysis (Online) (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

After completing this course, students will be able to apply research methodologies (including participation, observation, ethnographic and/or feedback interview, and other methods) to develop a working knowledge of a particular artistic tradition; use a notational system (if appropriate) to analyze the stylistic distinctives of this tradition; create an annotated research and analysis bibliography for a chosen art form; and describe an artistic tradition in terms of its formal and symbolic elements, history, and social functions.

WA3381 Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Undergraduate credits)

In this undergrad course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context. This course is also available at the graduate level by registering for WA5381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ.

WA5381 Arts for a Better Future (Intensive) (Summer) (3 Graduate credits)

In this grad-level course, students will learn to help a community recognize, value, and plan to use its own arts to meet local needs and goals. The course provides a compact overview of the Create Local Arts Together (CLAT) model of community engagement. The CLAT process consists of seven flexible steps grounded in ethnographic and appreciative inquiry approaches: meet a community and its arts; specify goals; select communication genre and content; analyze the genre; spark creativity; improve new works and creative systems; integrate and celebrate for continuity. Students will engage with the model through three pedagogical cycles, culminating in applying it to a real-life context. This course is also available at the undergraduate level by registering for WA3381.

See a short video here.

You may also view the Arts for a Better Future FAQ.

WA5383 Arts and Trauma Healing (Intensive) (Spring) (3 Graduate credits)

This course teaches a holistic, interactive approach to engaging Scripture in the healing process for people who suffer from the mental, emotional, and spiritual effects of trauma. It combines biblical truths with basic mental health principles expressed in ways that can be easily translated into other languages. Students learn to address both cognitive beliefs and emotions damaged by trauma, both in their own lives and in the lives of others. They learn to use participatory learning methods to train local church leaders in ways that help them to become effective care-givers. In particular, this course will emphasize the importance of performing and visual arts in trauma healing. Students will understand and be able to articulate and demonstrate the role, the value, and the effectiveness of using the arts in trauma healing from a historical and contemporary perspective. Students will be able to promote emotional and spiritual healing in traumatized communities through the use of local visual and performing arts existing in those communities.

Crafted as a “blended” course, with readings and assignments completed online during Sessions 1-2, the course also requires a two-week period of on-campus participatory afternoon classes. For details, see the Arts and Trauma Healing FAQ.